Lamborghini ownership is a rare experience, with only a few eccentric, wealthy patrons getting the privilege of manning any of the Italian masterpieces - but the car in question isn't just some bargain bin Gallardo, it's a 2001 Lamborghini Diablo 6.0, one of the rarest modern supercars and it needs a little bit of work. OK, alotta bit.

The 2001 Lamborghini Diablo 6.0 is pretty damn rare. Only 337 of the cars were made, and 2001 was the last year of the Diablo before it was replaced by the Murcielago. The 6.0-liter V12 has enough horsepower to give any modern supercar a run for its money, and with an all wheel drive system and many carbon fiber body panels, it was a great send-off to an absolutely spectacular car. This one, however, needs a fair amount of work, but although it may look bad, the work the car needs isn't insurmountable. With prices for these cars in particular reaching $300k as of late, it wouldn't be a bad investment if you could source parts reasonably and snatch this car up for less than the $75k asking price.

If the seller is to be taken at his word, very little is needed to make the car whole again. Here's an excerpt from the description:

Roof was damaged and repaired. Basically needs paint and parts put back that were removed to facilitate the repairs.This car runs and drives and all the parts needed to repair are included.Frame and suspension are fine

Although I'd take the seller's words with a grain of salt, if the frame, suspension, and running components are fine, and all interior and body panels are included with the sale, there isn't really much that needs to be done, other than prepping for a paint job and putting the car back together. A friend of mine owns one of these exact cars, and after seeing it in person, it's worth it, even in this visibly sorry state. Get it before Rob Dahm buys it as a parts car.

(H/T to Schep9d)


Tavarish is the founder of APiDA Online and writes about buying and selling cool cars on the internet. He owns the world's cheapest Mercedes S-Class, a graffiti-bombed Lexus, and he's the only Jalopnik author that has never driven a Miata. He also has a real name that he didn't feel was journalist-y enough so he used a pen name and this was the best he could do.

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